Balance

Balance for Balabustes – August 8th

Senior Kollel and Eishes Chayil Women’s Division in Cooperation with Nusach Hari B’nai Zion Sisterhood present “Balance for Balabustes” Strength Training ~ Bone Health ~ Flexibility for Females ~ with Dr. Jill Abrams Chiropractic Physician • Personal Fitness Trainer • Massage Therapist

Wednesday, July 11th 2:00 pm at NHBZ 650 N. Price Road Olivette, Missouri

Bring a Friend! Refreshments served!

Printable Flyer

5779 – High Holiday Information – 2018

Contents

Rabbi’s Message
President’s Message
About the Holidays
Holiday Preparations and Customs
Shul Etiquette
Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur Personnel
Aish HaTorah Learner’s Service
Children’s Programs
High Holiday & Yom Tov Complete Schedule of Services

Deep in the frozen tundra of Siberia, a squirrel buried fruits some 32,000 years ago from a plant that had white flowers. Recently, a team of Russian scientists announced that it had dug up the fruit and brought tissue from it back to life.  The previous record for regeneration of ancient flowers was with 2,000-year-old date palm seeds at Masada near the Dead Sea in Israel. Within weeks, the regenerated tissue from Siberia sprouted buds that developed into 36 flowering plants—known, for the botanists among you — as narrow-leafed campion plants.

Scientific research that revives extinct species is fascinating and somewhat controversial. It’s not quite Jurassic Park, but it is the real deal. In Judaism, we have various forms of regeneration. One type of spiritual regeneration is called tshuva. Not literally a rebirth, but a return. A return to Hashem. A return to the very best version of what we can possibly be. And the best time for for this spiritual regeneration is right now — just before and during the Yomim Norayim (Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur).

Every day provides a chance for a fresh start – to learn, grow, develop our strengths, heal ourselves from past regrets or hurts, and to move forward. However, there is no time quite as opportune as the Yomim Norayim to make great strides forward. The following words of the Midrash alert us to the great benefit of even small spiritual steps:

The Holy One, blessed be He, said to Israel, “My children, open for Me an opening [of tshuva – repentance] like the small size of an eye of a needle, and I will open for you an opening the size of a giant hall [Shir HaShirim Raba 5].

Throughout Elul and on Rosh Hashana, we hear the shofar blast. Historically, the shofar signaled the release of all slaves at the end of the Jubilee year. That sound should make us say, “Time to wake up! What can I change? What is one small, measurable, tangible thing I can do, to begin my new start?” If scientists can regenerate a 32,000 year old flower, we can certainly be inspired to change.  Despite our inertia of the previous year — all the disappointments, frustrations and failures we can begin again.

Rabbi Ze’ev Smason

President’s Message

My wife Peggy, our family and I wish you the sweetest of New Years. I am humbled and honored at the opportunity to serve as your president. Thank you to each and every one of our members for ensuring the health and vitality of our Shul. We rely on your active support so that we can continue to inspire, educate and create a sacred place for all our community. Rosh Hashanah and teshuvah are annual reminders of the possibilities to renew our relationship with HaShem and with each other.

Nusach Hari B’nai Zion is a family, and like the members of a family, we all have responsibilities.  At this time of year, it is appropriate to think not only of what the Shul can do for you, but to think of what you can do for the Shul. Feel free to reach out to me and the other officers and members of the congregation’s board. Volunteer to serve on a committee. Attend the many classes we offer. I assure you that you will get far more out of it than the time you put in.

Your Yom Kippur pledge will allow us to continue to be a welcome home to all in the NHBZ family. It is my fervent hope that each of us discover a new sense of possibility, a new belief in the gifts we have to offer and share, a renewed commitment to our Judaism and to our Shul.

May each of you be inscribed and sealed for a good year.

Jay B Umansky

About the Holidays

Selichos is a series of penitential prayers that are recited several days before Rosh Hashanah. It is important to attend synagogue for Selichos, as its text contains several important passages which may be said only in the presence of a minyan.

Rosh Hashanah means, literally, “Head of the Year.” It is the anniversary of the creation of Adam and Eve, highlighting the special relationship between G-d and humanity. The primary theme of the day is our acceptance of G-d as our King. G-d not only wants to have a world populated with people, He wants an intimate relationship with each one of us.  In addition to the collective aspects of Rosh Hashanah worship, each man and woman personally asks G-d to accept the coronation, thus creating the bond of “We are Your people and You are our King.”

Fast of Gedalia, usually occurs one day after Rosh Hashanah and commemorates the assassination of Gedalia, Governor of Judah, whose murder ended Jewish autonomy following the destruction of the First Temple. When Rosh Hashanah occurs on Thursday and Friday, the fast occurs on Sunday, since we don’t fast on Shabbos.

Yizkor, a special memorial prayer for the departed, will be recited following the Torah reading on Yom Kippur and Shemini Atzeres. Yizkor means “Remember” and represents the overall theme of the prayer, in which we implore G-d to remember the souls of our relatives and friends that have passed on. When we recite Yizkor, we renew and strengthen the connection between us and our loved one, bringing merit to the departed souls, elevating them in their celestial homes. The main component of Yizkor is our private pledge to give charity following the holiday in honor of the deceased. By giving charity, we are performing a positive physical deed in this world, something that the departed can no longer do.

Yom Kippur commemorates the day that G-d forgave the Jewish people for the sin of the Golden Calf. Moses spent 40 days on top of Mount Sinai pleading with G-d for forgiveness. On the tenth of Tishrei, G-d gave Moses the second set of tablets containing The Ten Commandments.

From that moment on, henceforth known as the Day of Atonement, we observe this date every year as a commemoration of our special relationship with G-d, a relationship that is strong enough to survive any rocky bumps it might encounter. Yom Kippur also features the Yizkor prayer, asking G-d to remember the souls of the departed.

Sukkos For forty years, as our ancestors crossed the Sinai Desert prior to their entry into the Holy Land, miraculous “clouds of glory” surrounded and hovered over them, shielding them from the dangers and discomforts of the desert. Ever since, we remember G-d’s kindness and reaffirm our trust in His providence by dwelling in a sukkah – a hut of temporary construction with a roof-covering of branches – for the duration of the Sukkos festival. For eight days and nights, we eat all our meals in the sukkah, and regard it as our home.

Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah are independent holidays that immediately follow Sukkos. These holidays are characterized by joyousness, which surpasses even the joy of Sukkos. Shemini Atzeres features the prayer for rain, officially commemorating the start of the rainy season in Israel, and the Yizkor prayer, asking G-d to remember the souls of the departed. The joy reaches its climax on Simchat Torah, when we celebrate the conclusion and restart of the annual Torah-reading cycle. The highlight of Simchas Torah are the hakafos, held both on the eve and morning of Simchat Torah, in which we march and dance with Torah scrolls around the synagogue.

Holiday Preparations and Customs

Eruv Tavshilin

When the first or second day of Yom Tov (Rosh Hashanah, Sukkos, Shemini Atzeres or Simchas Torah) falls on Friday, we must make an Eruv Tavshilin (mingling of cooked foods) in order to prepare food for Shabbos during Yom Tov.

According to Jewish Law, we may cook on Yom Tov, but only for that day, and not for the following day. The Rabbis instituted the Eruv Tavshilin to solve the problem. If you begin preparing for Shabbos on the day before Yom Tov begins (on Wednesday afternoon if Yom Tov falls on Thursday and Friday, or on Thursday afternoon if Yom Tov falls on Friday and Shabbos), then you can continue the preparation for Shabbos on Yom Tov itself.

Therefore, on the day before Yom Tov, cook a hard-boiled egg, and set it aside with a piece of bread or matzo as the beginning of preparations for the Shabbos following Yom Tov. Hold these ‘eruv-foods’ and recite the following prayer: Blessed art You, L-rd our G-d, King of the universe, Who has sanctified us with His commandments, and commanded us concerning the mitzvah of eruv.

This is followed by reciting the following declaration: Through this eruv may we be permitted to bake, cook, insulate, kindle a flame, prepare, and do anything necessary on the Festival for the sake of Shabbat — for us and for all Jews who live in this city.

The eruv-foods are set aside and eaten on Shabbos.  For more details, call Rabbi Smason.

Candle Lighting

We kindle two candles on Erev Rosh Hashanah (2 nights), Erev Yom Kippur, Erev Sukkos (2 nights), Erev Shemini Atzeres and Erev Simchas Torah.

Rosh Hashanah

ROSH HASHANAH CANDLE-LIGHTING

    1. Bo-ruch a-toh Ado-noi E-lo-hei-nu me-lech ho-olom a-sher ki-de-sha-nu be-mitz-vo-sov ve-tzi-vo- nu le-had-lik ner shel (Sha-bos v’shel ) Yom Ha-zi-karon.Translation: Blessed are you, L-rd our G-d, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments, and has commanded us to kindle the light of (the Sabbath and) the Day of Remembrance.
    2. Bo-ruch a-toh Ado-noi E-lo-hei-nu me-lech ho-olom she-he-che-ya-nu vi-kee-yi-ma-nu vi-hi-gee- an-u liz-man ha-zeh.Translation: Blessed are you, L-rd our G-d, King of the universe, who has kept us alive and sustained us and let us reach this time.

ON THE TABLE It is customary to have fish and carrots at the table on Rosh Hashanah. Fish and carrots are symbolic of being fruitful and multiplying. We hope that our good deeds and Simchas will be many during the coming year.

KIDDUSH is recited on both evenings and mornings of Rosh Hashana, at home, after services. The Kiddush for Rosh Hashanah is found in the siddur or bencher.

HONEY is used with Challah. We dip challah into honey after the Motzi prayer is recited. After eating the piece of bread, we pray for a sweet year. An apple is also dipped into honey, the blessing over fruit of the tree is recited and then, the prayer for a sweet year is offered. The prayer reads: May it be Your will O L-rd to renew for us a good, sweet year.

SH’HECHEYANU: It is customary to display new fruit or wear new garments on the 2nd eve of Rosh Hashanah and keep these in mind when offering the Sh’hecheyanu prayer.

Tashlich

Tashlich is a series of prayers that we say on the shore of a river or body of water that contains fish. We symbolically cast off our sins into the depths on the afternoon of the first day of Rosh Hashana.

Yom Kippur

KAPPORAS: It is customary to shlug Kapporas (swing a chicken around your head) on Erev Yom Kippur. Many Jews fulfill this custom today by placing money for each family member into a handkerchief, twirling it over your head and saying: This is my exchange, this is my substitute, this is my expiation. this money should go to charity and I should be privileged to have a long & pleasant life of peace”. We will place collection plates in the lobby on Erev Yom Kippur for you to fulfill your pledge.

YOM KIPPUR CANDLE-LIGHTING

      1. Bo-ruch a-toh Ado-noi E-lo-hei-nu me-lech ho-olom a-sher ki-de-sha-nu be-mitz-vo-sov ve-tzi- vo-nu le-had-lik ner shel (Sha-bos v’shel) Yom Ha-kipurim.Translation: Blessed are you, L-rd our G-d, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments, and has commanded us to kindle the light of (the Sabbath and) the Day of Atonement.
      2. Bo-ruch a-toh Ado-noi E-lo-hei-nu me-lech ho-olom she-he-che-ya-nu vi-kee-yi-ma-nu vi-hi-gee- an-u liz-man ha-zeh.Translation: Blessed are you, L-rd our G-d, King of the universe, who has kept us alive and sustained us and let us reach this time.

NOTE: Candle lighting will not be available at NHBZ on Erev Yom Kippur.

BLESSING THE CHILDREN: A beautiful custom is the blessing that parents give to their children before leaving for shul on Erev Yom Kippur.

For girls: May you be like Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel, and Leah.

For boys: May you be like Ephraim and Menashe.

Conclude for both boys and girls: May G-d bless you and guard you. May G-d show you favor and be gracious to you. May G-d show you kindness and grant you peace.

FAST OF YOM KIPPUR is a biblical law. In order to fast properly, the Rabbis urge that a good meal be eaten on Erev Yom Kippur. On Yom Kippur, men are encouraged to wear a Kittel, a white garment, and do not wear leather shoes. If a physician requires one to take medicine on Yom Kippur, call the Rabbi for proper procedures.

Sukkos/Shemini Atzeres/Simchas Torah

YOM TOV CANDLE-LIGHTING

  1. Bo-ruch a-toh Ado-noi E-lo-hei-nu me-lech ho-olom a-sher ki-de-sha-nu be-mitz-vo-sov e-tzi-vo- nu le-had-lik ner shel (Sha-bos v’shel) Yom Tov.Translation: Blessed are you, L-rd our G-d, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments, and has commanded us to kindle the light of (the Sabbath and) the Festival Day.
  2. Bo-ruch a-toh Ado-noi E-lo-hei-nu me-lech ho-olom she-he-che-ya-nu vi-kee-yi-ma-nu vi-hi-gee- an-u liz-man ha-zeh.Translation: Blessed are you, L-rd our G-d, King of the universe, who has kept us alive and sustained us and let us reach this time.

Shul Etiquette

  • Conversation with your neighbor is improper during services. Be mindful that our purpose in shul is to converse with and pour out our hearts to G-d. Page numbers will be announced from the Pulpit.  Please remain quiet so everyone can hear and follow the service.
  • Do not congregate in the lobby. Enter services quietly! Ushers will help you find your seat to eliminate any unnecessary disturbance.
  • No one will be allowed to enter during Sermons, Hineni, and Kedusha. It is improper to leave services during these times, or during the reading of the Torah.
    Sermons: 10:20 am. on Rosh Hashana, and 11:45 am on Yom Kippur.
    Hineni: 11:00 am on Rosh Hashana and 12:15 pm on Yom Kippur
  • Prayers may be offered in Hebrew or English. G-d hears all prayers that are offered with a sincere heart! Listen to 100 blasts of the Shofar that are sounded before and during Musaf on Rosh Hashana (at approximately 10:45 a.m.)
  • It is permissible to bring your Tallis on Rosh Hashana. You may bring your Tallis on Yom Kippur only if you live within the Eruv; otherwise you must bring it before Kol Nidre and leave it in Shul until after Yom Kippur. It is also customary to place charity in the charity plates in the lobby before Yom Kippur begins on Kol Nidre evening.
  • Personal cell phones may not be used.
  • Married women are encouraged to wear a hat or head covering. All girls and women must wear skirts or dresses.  No slacks please.  If you have a medical reason, please contact Rabbi Smason.
  • It is customary to make a contribution to the synagogue for honors received during the holidays.

Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur Personnel

Rosh Hashana

Pesukei D’Zimra……………. Menachem Szus
Shacharis……………… Rabbi Yaakov Berkowitz
Drasha (Sermon) …………Rabbi Ze’ev Smason
Torah Reading ………………………… Elie Needle
Musaf  ……………………………………. Elie Needle
Shofar  ……………………….Rabbi Ze’ev Smason

Yom Kippur

Kol Nidre …………………………………. Elie Needle
Drashas (Sermons)………. Rabbi Ze’ev Smason
Shacharis ……………… Rabbi Yaakov Berkowitz
Torah Reading …………………………. Elie Needle
Musaf ……………………………………… Elie Needle
Mincha …………………..Rabbi Yaakov Berkowitz
Neilah  …………………………………….. Elie Needle

Aish HaTorah Learner’s Services and Programs

Aish HaTorah will present several Learner’s Services and Programs during the holidays to be held on the lower level of the Shul.  The schedule is as follows:

Erev Rosh Hashana, Sunday, Sept. 9, 6:20 pm…………………………………………..  Rabbi Yosef David
Rosh Hashana Day 1, Monday, Sept. 10, 10:00 am ……………………………………. Rabbi Yosef David
Rosh Hashana Day 2, Tues., Sept. 11, 11:00 am
Special program …………. Rebbitzen Mimi David Yom Kippur, Wednesday, September 19, 10:00 am

Children’s Programs

Junior Congregation (ages 7-12), Tot Shabbat (ages 3-6), and Babysitting (ages birth – 2) will be held at the following days and times, except as noted:

Rosh Hashana Days 1 & 2, Monday, September 10 and Tues., Sept. 11, 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
Erev Yom Kippur, Tuesday, September 18, 5:45 pm – 9:00 pm (babysitting only)
Yom Kippur, Wednesday, September 19, 10:00 am – 1:00pm

Lunch will be provided for all children.  We encourage an RSVP to the office at 991-2100 ext. 2.

Check latest Shul bulletins in event of any time changes for Aish Services or Children’s Programs.

2018 High Holiday Newsletter 5779

High Holiday and Yom Tov Complete Schedule Of Services

SELICHOS PRIOR TO ROSH HASHANAH

Sat. Night / Sun. morn. Sept. 2 … 12:30 am

Mon. Sept 3 (Labor Day) ……………… 7:30 am

Tue. – Fri. Sept 4-7……. ………………. 6:30 am

Sunday, Sept. 9 ………………………….. 7:15 am

ROSH HASHANA

Sunday Evening, September 9

Learner’s Service ……………………….. 6:40 pm
Mincha ……………………………………… 6:50 pm
Candle Lighting  …………………………. 7:01 pm

Monday, September 10

Shacharis………………………………….. 8:00 am
Learner’s Service ………10:00 am – 12:30 pm
Drasha (Sermon) ……………………… 10:20 am
Children’s Programs …..10:00 am to 1:00 pm
Shofar …………………………………….. 10:45 am
Mincha-Tashlich…………………………. 6:50 pm
*Candle Lighting ………………………… 8:02 pm

Tuesday, September 11

Shacharis………………………………….. 8:00 am
Learner’s Program …….11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Drasha (Sermon) ……………………… 10:20 am
Children’s Programs …..10:00 am to 1:00 pm
Shofar …………………………………….. 10:45 am
Mincha. …………………………………….. 6:50 pm
Yom Tov Candle Lighting…………….. 8:01 pm

TZOM GEDALIAH (Fast of Gedaliah) Wednesday, September12

Fast Begins……………………………….. 5:27 am
Selichos. …………………………………… 6:45 am
Shacharis …………………………………. 7:00 am
Mincha. …………………………………….. 6:40 pm
Fast Concludes………………………….. 7:56 pm

YOM KIPPUR

Erev Yom Kippur – Tuesday, September 18

Mincha. …………………………………….. 1:30 pm
Fast Begins ………………….. Prior to Kol Nidre Candle Lighting at home *. 6:47 pm or earlier

(* No Candle Lighting at NHBZ)

Babysitting ……………………5:45pm – 9:00 pm
Take out Torahs……………………….. 6:15 pm
Kol Nidre …………………………………… 6:20 pm
Maariv Concludes …. .Approximately 9:30 pm

Yom Kippur – Wednesday, September 19

Shacharis………………………………….. 8:30 am
Learner’s Service ……………………… 10:00 am
Children’s Programs …..10:00 am to 1:00 pm
Drasha (Sermon) ……………………… 11:45 am
Yizkor……………………………………… 12:15 pm
Musaf……………………………………….. 1:00 pm
Mincha  …………………………………….. 4:55 pm
Neilah. ……………………………………… 6:25 pm
Maariv………………………………………. 7:35 pm
Havdalah. …………………………………. 7:50 pm
Shofar Sounded…………………………. 7:55 pm

Fast Concludes……..After Shofar is Sounded

SUKKOS

Sunday Evening, September 23

Mincha ……………………………………… 6:30 pm
Candle Lighting ………………………….. 6:39 pm

Monday, September 24

Shacharis………………………………….. 9:00 am
Drasha (Sermon). …………………….. 10:45 am
Mincha  …………………………………….. 6:30 pm
*Candle Lighting ………………………… 7:40 pm

Tuesday, September 25

Shacharis………………………………….. 9:00 am
Drasha (none today)

Mincha  …………………………………….. 6:30 pm
Yom Tov Ends …………………………… 7:39 pm

CHOL HAMOED SUKKOS

Wed. – Fri. Sept. 26 – 28

Shacharis…………………………………. .6:45 am
Mincha ……………………………………… 6:30 pm

Shabbos, Sept 29.

Shacharis………………………………….. 9:00 am
Mincha ……………………………………… 6:15 pm

Sunday, September 30

Shachris-Hoshana Raba  …………….. 8:00 am

SHEMINI ATZERES

Sunday Evening, September 30

Mincha ……………………………………… 6:20 pm
Candle Lighting. …………………………. 6:28 pm

Monday, October 1

Shacharis…………………………………. .9:00 am
Yizkor……………………………………… 10:30 am
Mincha. …………………………………….. 6:20 pm
Ma’ariiv …………………………………….. 7:10 pm
Candle Lighting  …………………………. 7:29 pm

SIMCHAS TORAH

Monday Evening, October 1

Hakofos & Parade of Torahs. ……….. 7:25 pm
Break for dinner (free to all) ………….8:00 pm
Resume Hakofos. ………………………. 8:35 pm

Tuesday, October 2

Shacharis………………………………….. 9:00 am
Kol Hanarim – Call all kids to Torah 11:00 am
Mincha ……………………………………… 5:30 pm
Yom Tov Ends. ………………………….. 7:28 pm

Parshas: Va’eschanan

Moses continues his final speech to the Children of Israel. He tells them how he entreated G-d to allow him to enter the land of Israel, but his request was denied. Moses was allowed, however, to see the Promised Land from the peak of Mount Pisgah. Moses appeals to the people to keep the Torah, telling them to neither add to nor subtract from its mitzvos. They are told to always remember the Revelation at Mt. Sinai where every man, woman and child heard the presentation of the Ten Commandments. Moses repeats the Ten Commandments, with subtle differences between this version and that of the Book of Exodus. The Shema, found in this week’s Torah portion, expresses our belief that G-d is One and states our commitment to love and serve Him. It exhorts us to transmit Torah to the next generation, and its laws should be remembered by a ‘sign’ upon one’s hand and forehead (tefillin) and written on the doorposts of one’s home (mezuzah). Finally, Moses encourages the people to trust in G-d and remain faithful to the Torah. Intermarriage is prohibited, and the source that Jewish identity is transmitted through the mother is stated.

Sisterhood

The Sisterhood Scoop – July 2018

The Sisterhood Scoop July 2018

NHBZ Sisterhood presents the 3rd Annual
Dine ‘n’ Style
Luncheon & Fashion Show

Sunday, August 19 – 11:30 a.m.

Falling for Fashion featuring:

Fall/Winter 2018 Fashions from Orli’s BoutiqueLuncheon, and, of course, Shopping!
For more information call Debbie Sher.

NEXT SISTERHOOD BOARD MEETING: Tuesday, July 24, 6:00 pm

Sisterhood’s NEW Book Club is Up and Running!

Critics agree: Sisterhood’s BOOK CLUB is a hit! The next book selection is: Eternal Life by award-winning novelist Dara Horn. Described as “a gripping, hilarious, and moving psychological novel, that celebrates the bonds between generations, the power of faith, the purpose of death, and the reasons for being alive.”

Discussion of Eternal Life will be Monday, August 27, 7:15-8:45pm at Mansions on the Plaza, 8300 Delmar hosted by Chana Lowenstein FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
Fran Alper at 314-993-4024 ~ fran.alper@outlook.com or Chana at 314-274-8718 ~ lclowenstein@gmail.com

Understanding Tisha B’Av Mourning What is Missing

Tisha B’Av is not about the destruction of a building, but about the exile of a people from their homeland, an estrangement of a nation from G‑d, and a separation of the spiritual from the physical. Each one of us has individual struggles and all of us await redemption from them, and the day when Tisha B’Av will no longer be a day of mourning, but a day of celebration. Why do the Jewish people continue to mourn and weep year after year? Mourning a death is very different than mourning something or someone that is missing. Even if a person is missing and presumed dead, the search for that person is never forgotten. Until there is closure, we cannot begin to move on. Tisha B’Av shows us that we are not mourning a death, we are mourning what is missing. The Temples were destroyed, but not forever. Until the Third Temple is rebuilt Tisha B’Av is the reminder of what we have temporarily lost. This is why one of the questions that will be asked by the Heavenly Court after a person dies is “Did you expect (wait for) the Redemption?” Some say that the word used by the sages is “to expect” (tzepita) or “wait for.” It doesn’t use “hope for” or “want,” but a word which describes a looking out for – with certainty. This is like a family with a missing child. Years may have gone by, but that family waits every single day for a phone call that their child has been found. Every day they grieve that the child is missing, yet simultaneously, every day they pray and hope. This is the crying and mourning we do on Tisha B’Av. For as hard as it is to live without our Temple and to be in exile, we wait every single day for it to be returned to us and pray that immediately we will be redeemed.

  • excerpted from Elana Mizrahi at www.chabad.org

The Sisterhood Scoop – July 2018

For information or to join Sisterhood, call the NHBZ office at 314-991-2100, ext. 3, or email: sisterhood@nhbz.org

Shaving Israel – July 29th

Shaving Israel

Speakers Series Sunday, July 29 4:00-5:00 pm Guest Speaker Talia Wolkowitz

Talia is a native St. Louisan who joined the IDF in December of 2015. She rose to the rank of Sergeant and was a Canine-Track and Attack Operational Handler.

Stay for NHBZ Pizza Night from 5-7pm!
All-you-can-eat pizza, pasta, & salad – $12.00

Slices for Soldiers

Dear NHBZ Members,

As you know, Israel is embroiled in conflict with Syria and ultimately Iran on its northern borders. If you’ve found yourself asking “What can I do?” or “In what way can I help?” The Israel Committee of Nusach Hari B’nai Zion is bringing back the Slices for Soldiers project that was so successful in 2014. This seemingly small gesture will go a long way toward providing Israeli soldiers with a little smile and respite from the battle field. Previously the project raised $2,500 to feed front line Israeli Soldiers, so let’s come together and make this campaign even more successful!

We will be collecting money from today until July 30th, with every dollar used for the purchase of pizza from local Israeli pizzerias for troops on the front lines. Receiving pizza on the battlefield from people half way around the world goes a long way to encourage our soldiers. May Hashem guard and protect them and all of Israel, and may they be successful in their mission and return home quickly and safely.

Please mail your check, made out to NHBZ to: Nusach Hari B’nai Zion, 650 North Price Road, Olivette, MO 63132 ~ Sorry, no credit cards for this campaign.

Thank You,
Jason Loiterstein
NHBZ Israel Committee

Rabbi Smason – CIAO St. Louis Radio!

Rabbi Smason to be interviewed on CIAO St. Louis Radio! Rabbi Ride-Around mania gets an early start this summer. In advance of this year’s Ride-Around, Rabbi Smason will be interviewed on Monday, July 16 at 1:00 P.M. on CIAO St Louis radio. Listen to the live-streamed broadcast at www.ciaostl.com and Facebook Live (from the CIAO St Louis Facebook page). In addition, a podcast will be available for download from the website. This year’s Ride-Around will take place on August 26. Details to follow!

UPDATE

Recipes for Life-Rabbi Smason (Gino Bartali)

July 16, 2018

On August 29, 2018, Rabbi Ze’ev Smason will ride his bike around Forest Park as a fundraiser for his congregation. He is dedicating his ride to Gino Bartali, an accomplished Italian cyclist, who was responsible for saving over 800 Jewish lives during World War II in Italy. We interviewed Rabbi Smason today. Listen to this wonderful story about the unsung hero, 2-time winner of the Tour de France, 3-time winner of the Giro del Italia and one of the great humanitarians of his time. “Good is something that you do. It is not something you boast.” Gino Bartali

 

 

Parshas: Matos — Masei

Parshas: Matos — Masei

In the first of this week’s two action-packed portions, Moses teaches the rules and restrictions governing oaths and vows. Promises are serious business. When we say that we plan to do something — even something as simple as, ‘I’ll call you later’ — we’re bound by our words. Anticipating entrance into the land of Israel, the tribes of Gad and Reuben petition Moses to remain on the eastern side of the Jordan River because that land is particularly suitable for grazing their cattle. Moses, not wanting to ‘steer’ Gad and Reuben wrong, grants their request on the condition that they first help the rest of the nation in conquering the entire land of Israel before returning to settle their inheritance.

Masei (a word that means ‘journeys’) begins with a listing of the 42 encampments of the Jewish people’s 40 year journey from the Exodus until the crossing of the Jordan River into the Land of Israel. The boundaries of the Land of Israel are defined. Since the Levites would not be receiving a regular portion of the land, 48 cities are set aside for them. Cities of refuge are established; one who unintentionally murders can flee there. So ends the book of Numbers, the fourth of the Books of the Torah. Next week — on to Deuteronomy!

The 9 Days

Rosh Chodesh Av occurred on Friday, July 13. This began a period of time known as the ‘9
Days.’ The first nine days of the month of Av, and also the morning of the tenth, are days of acute mourning for the destruction of the first and second Holy Temples. In addition to the restrictions that apply to the entire three-week period, during this time we refrain from the following additional joyous activities: Eating meat and drinking wine (except for Shabbos), laundering clothing, swimming or bathing for pleasure and remodeling or expanding a home. For questions or further details, please contact Rabbi Smason.

Dine ‘n’ Style 2018

NHBZ Sisterhood presents the 3rd Annual Dine ‘n’ Style Fashion Show & Luncheon

Falling for Fashion featuring Fall/Winter 2018 Fashions from Orli’s Boutique, Luncheon, and, of course, lots of Shopping!

Sunday, August 19, 2018

Shopping opens at 10:00 AM
Luncheon & Fashion Show promptly at Noon

In addition to Orli’s Boutique previewing women’s Fall fashions, visit our lower level “Retail Market” featuring:

  • Accessories and Gifts
  • Artisan Jewelry
  • Creative Design Jewelry
  • Fashionable Headscarves
  • Fused Frameworked Glass
  • Motek Israeli Jewelry
  • Sculpted Silverware, and more…
  • Israeli Items, and More

Nusach Hari B’nai Zion 650 North Price Road, Olivette

Registration $20 by August 12 call NHBZ – 314-991-2100, ext. 3, email FashionShow@nhbz.org




For more information Call Debbie Sher at 314-753-2261 or email: daps114@gmail.com For information or to join Sisterhood, call the NHBZ office at 314-991-2100, ext. 3, or email: sisterhood@nhbz.org

2018 Dine snd Style Flyer (Printable PDF)