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High Holiday and Yom Tov Complete Schedule of Services 2022/5783

 High Holiday Newsletter 2022 /5783 

High Holiday Newsletter 2022/5783

Contents

Rabbi’s Message
President’s Message
About the Holidays
Holiday Preparations and Customs
Shul Etiquette
Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur Personnel
Aish HaTorah Learner’s Service
Children’s Programs
High Holiday & Yom Tov Complete Schedule of Services

Rabbi’s Message

The Sages refer to the month of Tishrei as Yerach Hueisanim – the month of might. It is the month which contains the most important days of the year: the High Holidays of Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur. These days offer us a most unique opportunity.

The prophet beckons us, “Look for Hashem when He is to be found, call out to Him when He is close.” (Yeshaya 55:6) The Rambam says that although an individual can find his creator all year round through repentance and prayer, the ten days from Rosh Hashana to Yom Kippur are an especially opportune time for finding Hashem.

Let us make the most of this opportunity. Let us utilize these days for what they are intended for – prayer, introspection and closeness to Hashem.

I am most excited to join the NHBZ Family as we embark on this all-important journey together.

My wife Batya, and my dear children, Chava, Devora Leah, Nechama and Yakov, join me in wishing you and your families a Shana Tova, a happy, healthy, and sweet new year.

Rabbi Chaim Bogopulsky

President’s Message

During this holiest time of the year, we prepare to enter a new state of mind. We carve out a strategy of improvement on a level that is both spiritual and meaningful in nature for each of us. Rosh Hashana begins with the ten days of Repentance.

May we renew our commitment to Judaism and to Hashem, and may we merit to move forward towards a path that leads to a better future. We abandon the divisiveness, the corruption, the pettiness, and the lashon hara of the outside world, and we come together as one extended family under the spiritual leadership of our new Rabbi – Rabbi Chaim Bogopulsky.

On behalf of Barb, Jamie, Josh, and my Father, I wish you and your families a Shana Tova, a happy and healthy year filled with joy and prosperity. May we have a good and sweet year and be inscribed in the Book of Life.

Kenneth Bressler, Shul President

About the Holidays

Selichos is a series of penitential prayers that are recited several days before Rosh Hashanah. It is important to attend synagogue for Selichos, as its text contains several important passages which may be said only in the presence of a minyan.

Rosh Hashanah means, literally, “Head of the Year.” It is the anniversary of the creation of Adam and Eve, highlighting the special relationship between G-d and humanity. The primary theme of the day is our acceptance of G-d as our King. G-d not only wants to have a world populated with people, He wants an intimate relationship with each one of us. In addition to the collective aspects of Rosh Hashanah worship, each man and woman personally asks G-d to accept the coronation, thus creating the bond of “We are Your people and You are our King.”

Fast of Gedalia, usually occurs one day after Rosh Hashanah and commemorates the assassination of Gedalia, Governor of Judah, whose murder ended Jewish autonomy following the destruction of the First Temple. When Rosh Hashanah occurs on Thursday and Friday, the fast occurs on Sunday, since we don’t fast on Shabbos.

Yizkor, a special memorial prayer for the departed, will be recited following the Torah reading on Yom Kippur and Shemini Atzeres. Yizkor means “Remember” and represents the overall theme of the prayer, in which we implore G-d to remember the souls of our relatives and friends that have passed on. When we recite Yizkor, we renew and strengthen the connection between us and our loved one, bringing merit to the departed souls, elevating them in their celestial homes. The main component of Yizkor is our private pledge to give charity following the holiday in honor of the deceased. By giving charity, we are performing a positive physical deed in this world, something that the departed can no longer do.

Yom Kippur commemorates the day that G-d forgave the Jewish people for the sin of the Golden Calf. Moses spent 40 days on top of Mount Sinai pleading with G-d for forgiveness. On the tenth of Tishrei, G-d gave Moses the second set of tablets containing The Ten Commandments.

From that moment on, henceforth known as the Day of Atonement, we observe this date every year as a commemoration of our special relationship with G-d, a relationship that is strong enough to survive any rocky bumps it might encounter. Yom Kippur also features the Yizkor prayer, asking G-d to remember the souls of the departed.

Sukkos For forty years, as our ancestors crossed the Sinai Desert prior to their entry into the Holy Land, miraculous “clouds of glory” surrounded and hovered over them, shielding them from the dangers and discomforts of the desert. Ever since, we remember G-d’s kindness and reaffirm our trust in His providence by dwelling in a sukkah – a hut of temporary construction with a roof-covering of branches – for the duration of the Sukkos festival. For eight days and nights, we eat all our meals in the sukkah, and regard it as our home.

Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah are independent holidays that immediately follow Sukkos. These holidays are characterized by joyousness, which surpasses even the joy of Sukkos. Shemini Atzeres features the prayer for rain, officially commemorating the start of the rainy season in Israel, and the Yizkor prayer, asking G-d to remember the souls of the departed. The joy reaches its climax on Simchat Torah, when we celebrate the conclusion and restart of the annual Torah-reading cycle. The highlight of Simchas Torah are the hakafos, held both on the eve and morning of Simchat Torah, in which we march and dance with Torah scrolls around the synagogue.

Holiday Preparations and Customs

Candle Lighting

We kindle two candles on Erev Rosh Hashanah (2 nights), Erev Yom Kippur, Erev Sukkos (2 nights), Erev Shemini Atzeres and Erev Simchas Torah.

Rosh Hashanah

ROSH HASHANAH CANDLE LIGHTING

Bo-ruch a-toh Hashem E-lo-kei-nu me-lech ho-olom a-sher ki-de-sha-nu be-mitz-vo-sov ve-tzi- vo-nu le-had-lik ner shel (Sha-bos v’shel ) Yom Ha-zi-karon.

Translation: Blessed are you, L-rd our G-d, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments, and has commanded us to kindle the light of (the Sabbath and) the Day of Remembrance.

ROSH HASHANAH CANDLE LIGHTING (con’t)

Bo-ruch a-toh Hashem E-lo-kei-nu me-lech ho-olom she-he-che-ya-nu vi-kee-yi-ma-nu vi-hi- gee-an-u liz-man ha-zeh.

Translation: Blessed are you, L-rd our G-d, King of the universe, who has kept us alive and sustained us and let us reach this time.

Holiday Preparations and Customs

ON THE TABLE It is customary to have fish and carrots at the table on Rosh Hashanah. Fish and carrots are symbolic of being fruitful and multiplying. We hope that our good deeds and Simchas will be many during the coming year.

KIDDUSH is recited on both evenings and mornings of Rosh Hashanah, at home, after services. The Kiddush for Rosh Hashanah is found in the siddur or bencher.

HONEY is used with Challah. We dip challah into honey after the Motzi prayer is recited. After eating the piece of bread, we pray for a sweet year. An apple is also dipped into honey, the blessing over fruit of the tree is recited and then, the prayer for a sweet year is offered. The prayer reads: May it be Your will O L-rd to renew for us a good, sweet year.

SH’HECHEYANU: It is customary to display new fruit or wear new garments on the 2nd eve of Rosh Hashanah and keep these in mind when offering the Sh’hecheyanu prayer.

Tashlich

Tashlich is a series of prayers that we say on the shore of a river or body of water that contains fish. We symbolically cast off our sins into the depths on the afternoon of the first day of Rosh Hashanah.

Yom Kippur

KAPPORAS: It is customary to shlug Kapporas (swing a chicken around your head) on Erev Yom Kippur. Many Jews fulfill this custom today by placing money for each family member into a handkerchief, twirling it over your head and saying: This is my exchange, this is my substitute, this is my expiation. This money should go to charity and I should be privileged to have a long & pleasant life of peace”. We will place collection plates in the lobby on Erev Yom Kippur for you to fulfill your pledge.

YOM KIPPUR CANDLE LIGHTING

  1. Bo-ruch a-toh Hashem E-lo-kei-nu me-lech ho-olom a-sher ki-de-sha-nu be-mitz-vo-sov ve-tzi- vo-nu le-had-lik ner shel (Sha-bos v’shel) Yom Ha-kipurim.Translation: Blessed are you, L-rd our G-d, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments, and has commanded us to kindle the light of (the Sabbath and) the Day of Atonement.
  2. Bo-ruch a-toh Hashem E-lo-kei-nu me-lech ho-olom she-he-che-ya-nu vi-kee-yi-ma-nu vi-hi- gee-an-u liz-man ha-zeh.

Translation: Blessed are you, L-rd our G-d, King of the universe, who has kept us alive and sustained us and let us reach this time.

NOTE: Candle lighting will not be available at NHBZ on Erev Yom Kippur.

BLESSING THE CHILDREN: A beautiful custom is the blessing that parents give to their children before leaving for shul on Erev Yom Kippur.

For girls: May you be like Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel, and Leah.

For boys: May you be like Ephraim and Menashe.

Conclude for both boys and girls: May G-d bless you and guard you. May G-d show you favor and be gracious to you. May G-d show you kindness and grant you peace.

FAST OF YOM KIPPUR is a biblical law. In order to fast properly, the Rabbis urge that a good meal be eaten on Erev Yom Kippur. On Yom Kippur, men are encouraged to wear a Kittel, a white garment, and do not wear leather shoes. If a physician requires one to take medicine on Yom Kippur, call the Rabbi for proper procedures.

Sukkos/Shemini Atzeres/Simchas Torah

YOM TOV CANDLE LIGHTING

  1. Bo-ruch a-toh Hashem E-lo-kei-nu me-lech ho-olom a-sher ki-de-sha-nu be-mitz-vo-sov e-tzi-vo- nu le-had-lik ner shel (Sha-bos v’shel) Yom Tov.Translation: Blessed are you, L-rd our G-d, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments, and has commanded us to kindle the light of (the Sabbath and) the Festival Day.
  2. Bo-ruch a-toh Hashem E-lo-kei-nu me-lech ho-olom she-he-che-ya-nu vi-kee-yi-ma-nu vi-hi-gee- an-u liz-man ha-zeh.

Translation: Blessed are you, L-rd our G-d, King of the universe, who has kept us alive and sustained us and let us reach this time.

Shul Etiquette

  • Conversation with your neighbor is improper during services. Be mindful that our purpose in shul is to converse with and pour out our hearts to G-d. Page numbers will be announced from the Pulpit. Please remain quiet so everyone can hear and follow the service.
  • Do not congregate in the lobby. Enter services quietly! Greeters will help you find your seat to eliminate any unnecessary disturbance.
  • Prayers may be offered in Hebrew or English. G-d hears all prayers that are offered with a sincere heart! Listen to 100 blasts of the Shofar that are sounded before and during Musaf on Rosh Hashanah (at approximately 10:45 a.m.)
  • It is permissible to bring your Tallis on Rosh Hashanah. You may bring your Tallis on Yom Kippur only if you live within the Eruv; otherwise you must bring it before Kol Nidre and leave it in Shul until after Yom Kippur. It is also customary to place charity in the charity plates in the lobby before Yom Kippur begins on Kol Nidre evening.
  • Personal cell phones may not be used.
  • Married women are encouraged to wear a hat or head covering. All girls and women must wear skirts or dresses. No slacks please. If you have a medical reason, please contact Rabbi Bogopulsky.
  • It is customary to make a contribution to the synagogue for honors received during the holidays.

Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur Personnel

Rosh Hashanah

Pesukei D’Zimra TBD
Shacharis Rabbi Yonason Goldson
Drasha (Sermon) Rabbi Chaim Bogopulsky
Torah Reading Elie Needle
Musaf Elie Needle

Yom Kippur

Kol Nidre Elie Needle
Drashas (Sermons) Rabbi Chaim Bogopulsky
Shacharis Rabbi Yonason Goldson
Torah Reading Elie Needle
Musaf Elie Needle
Mincha Rabbi Yonason Goldson
Neilah Elie Needle

Aish HaTorah Learner’s Services and Programs

Aish HaTorah will present several Learner’s Services and Programs during the holidays to be held on the lower level of the Shul. The schedule is as follows:

Rosh Hashanah Day 1, Monday, September 25, 10:00 am Rabbi Yosef David
Rosh Hashanah Day 2, Tuesday, September 26, 11:00 am Rabbi Yosef David
Yom Kippur, Wednesday, October 5, 10:00 am-1:00 pm Rabbi Yosef David

Youth Programs

Youth Programming for Grades 5-8 and Grades K-4, and Babysitting (ages birth – Pre-K) will be held on the following days and times:

Rosh Hashanah Days 1 & 2, Monday, Sept. 26 and Tues., Sept. 27, 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
Yom Kippur, Thursday, Oct. 5, 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
Lunch will be provided for all children.

Check the latest Shul bulletins in event of any time changes for Aish Services or Children’s Programs.

High Holiday & Yom Tov Complete Schedule Of Services

SELICHOT PRIOR TO ROSH HASHANA

Motzei Shabbos, Sept 17 – 12:30 am
(12:30 a.m., September 18)

ROSH HASHANA
Sunday, September 25

Selichos 8:00 am
Mincha 6:30 pm
Candle Lighting 6:35 pm

Monday, September 26

Shacharis 8:00 am
Learners’ Service 10:00 am
Children’s Program 10:00 am–12:30 pm
Drasha (Sermon) 10:20 am
Shofar 10:45 am
Mincha-Tashlich 6:20 pm
Yom Tov Candle Lighting 7:37 pm

Tuesday, September 27

Shacharis 8:00 am
Children’s Program 10:00 am–12:30 pm
Drasha (Sermon) 10:20 am
Shofar 10:45 am
Learners’ Service 11:00 am
Mincha. 6:20 pm
Yom Tov Ends at 7:35 pm

TZOM GEDALIAH
(Fast of Gedaliah)
Wednesday, September 28

Fast Begins 5:36 am
Selichos. 6:30 am
Mincha. 6:15 pm
Fast Concludes at 7:21 pm

YOM KIPPUR

Erev Yom Kippur –
Tuesday, October 4

Mincha 1:30 pm
Fast Begins at 6:35 pm
Candle Lighting at home * Before 6:21 pm
(* No Candle Lighting at NHBZ)
Take out Torahs at 6:20 pm
Kol Nidre 6:25 pm
Ma’ariv Concludes 9:00 pm
Yom Kippur – Wednesday, October 5
Shacharis 8:30 am
Learners’ Service 10:00 am
Children’s Program 10:00 am–12:30 pm
Drasha (Sermon) 11:15 am
Yizkor 11:45 am
Musaf 12:30 pm
Mincha 4:30 pm Neilah 5:50 pm
Ma’ariv 7:10 pm
Havdalah 7:23 pm
Shofar Sounded 7:25 pm
Fast Concludes After Shofar is Sounded

SUKKOS

Sunday Evening, October 9
Mincha 6:10 pm
Candle Lighting 6:13 pm
Monday, October 10
Shacharis 9:00 am
Drasha (Sermon). 10:45 am
Mincha 6:05 pm
Yom Tov Candle Lighting 7:15 pm
Tuesday, October 11
Shacharis. 9:00 am
Drasha 10:45 am
Mincha 6:05 pm
Yom Tov Ends at 7:14 pm

CHOL HAMOED SUKKOS

Wed-Fri, October 12-14
Shacharis .6:45 am
Mincha 6:05 pm
Shabbos Candle Lighting 6:06 pm
Shabbos, October 15
Shacharis 9:00 am
Mincha 5:50 pm
Shabbos Ends at 7:08 pm
Sunday, October 16
Shacharis – Hoshana Rabba 7:00 am

SHEMINI ATZERES
Sunday Evening, October 16

Mincha 6:00 pm
Candle Lighting. 6:03 pm
Monday, October 17
Shacharis .9:00 am
Yizkor 10:30 am
Mincha. 5:50 pm
Ma’ariv 7:00 pm
Candle Lighting 7:05 pm

SIMCHAS TORAH

Monday Evening, October 17
Hakofos & Parade of Torahs. 7:10 pm
Break for dinner (free to all) at 8:00 pm
Resume Hakofos. 8:45 pm

Tuesday, October 18
Shacharis. 9:00 am
Kol Hanarim – Call all kids to Torah at 10:45 am
Mincha 5:50 pm
Yom Tov Ends. 7:04 pm

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