The Sisterhood Scoop – August 8th, 2020

Volume 3 Number 26 – August 1, 2020 – 11 Av 5780

 

NEXT SISTERHOOD BOARD MEETING:

Tuesday, July 11, 5:30 pm.  Watch your email for ZOOM LINK

 

NHBZ SISTERHOOD ANNOUNCES A NEW PROJECT FOR THE NEW YEAR

Rosh Hashanah Gift Baskets to send to your family & friends.

Sisterhood will create and  deliver beautiful baskets  with all the essentials– honey, challah, grape juice,  and other sweet goodies –all  beautifully wrapped, including  blessings and words of inspiration for a sweet holiday! Send an unexpected gift to stay connected and to wish ‘shana tova’ to a friend, family or shul member. See the Sisterhood Gift Basket page for details on how to order! Or check your email for details on how to order!

 

Coming Soon…

Watch your email for Sisterhood’s ‘New Year Greetings’ Fundraiser.  Proceeds will benefit NHBZ’s Passport to Israel Program and other Sisterhood projects. Please be as generous as possible. Help support your NHBZ Sisterhood!

 

Join Sisterhood Book Club and come read with us!

The next Book Club meeting will be on Zoom on Monday August 24, 7:15-8:45PM, and the book selection is: The Lost Girls of Paris, by Pam Jenoff. Set in Manhattan, New York, in 1946, Grace Healey passed through Grand Central Terminal on her way to work and found an abandoned suitcase beneath a bench.

Inside she discovered twelve photographs of different women. A remarkable story of friendship and courage centered around three women and a ring of female secret agents during World War II.

For more information call Terri Schnitzer 

Do You Know The Origin of ‘Nachas’?

Nachas is the pride and joy we get from our children. A common Jewish sentiment is “may you have nachas from your children”.

Nachas comes from the Hebrew word nachat, meaning satisfaction and pleasure. (That in turn derives from the Hebrew lanuach, meaning to rest.) To derive nachas is also expressed in the Yiddish phrase to shep nachasShep comes from the Yiddish shepn, meaning scoop. – from Dr. Yvette Alt Miller at www.aish.com

 

The Nine Days –Shabbat Chazon

The Shabbat preceding the Ninth of Av is called Shabbat Chazon – “Shabbat of the Vision.” This Shabbat’s reading from the Prophets begins with the words Chazon Yeshayahu, the “vision of Isaiah” regarding the destruction of the Holy Temple. The legendary chassidic master Rabbi Levi Yitzchak of Berditchev said that on this special Shabbat, every Jewish soul is shown a vision of the third Holy Temple. The purpose of this vision is to arouse within every Jew a yearning to actually see this edifice which will be built by G‑d, and to do as many mitzvot as possible in order to realize this dream. While this vision may not be sensed with the physical eyes, the soul certainly experiences this vision, and it affects the person on the subconscious level.

There is no mourning on Shabbat. (from Chabad.org)

Parshah Devarim Deuteronomy 1:12–21

 

‘History vs. Memory’

Thoughts on Parshas Eikev from Rabbi Jonathan Sacks

Biblical Hebrew has no word for history. Modern Hebrew had to borrow a word: historia. The key word of the Hebrew Bible is not history but memory. Zachor, the command to remember, occurs time and again in the Torah… There is a profound difference between history and memory. History is his story – an event that happened sometime else to someone else. Memory is my story – something that happened to me and is part of who I am. History is information. Memory, by contrast, is part of identity. I can study the history of other peoples, cultures, and civilisations. They deepen my knowledge and broaden my horizons. But they do not make a claim on me. They are the past as past.

Memory is the past as present, as it lives on in me. Without memory there can be no identity. Alzheimer’s disease, the progressive atrophying of memory function, is also the disintegration of personality. As with individuals, so with a nation: it has a continuing identity to the extent that it can remember where it came from and who its ancestors were.

– from The Jonathan Sacks Haggadah, pp. 38-39

For information or to join Sisterhood, call the NHBZ office at 314-991-2100, ext. 3, or email: sisterhood@nhbz.org