The Sisterhood Scoop – December 26th, 2020

Volume 3 Number 43 – December 26, 2020 – 11 Tevet 5781

Book Club News

Next Book Club Meeting is Monday, January 4th

The next ZOOM meeting of the NHBZ Sisterhood Book Club will be Monday, Jan. 4, 7:15-8:45 pm. The book is: “How to Fight Anti-Semitism,” by Bari Weiss, who was the featured speaker at the recent JFed’s Women’s Philanthropy event and is the former op-ed staff editor for The New York Times.

Bari Weiss grew up at the Tree of Life Synagogue, the site of last year’s Shabbat morning massacre in Pittsburgh. Her insightful book, vividly written, is must-read argument against modern-day anti-Semitism.

Contact Terri Schnitzer or the Sisterhood to submit your book choice for the Feb. 22, 2021 Book Club Meeting:

  • “Noah’s Wife” by Lindsay Starck
  • “Finding Dorothy” by Elizabeth Letts

To join Sisterhood’s Book Club, or, to suggest a book to read, contact Terri Schnitzer.

On Judgement…

Rabbi Ishmael would say: One who refrains from serving as a judge avoids hatred, thievery and false oaths. One who frivolously hands down rulings is a fool, wicked and arrogant.

He would also say: Do not judge on your own, for there is none qualified to judge alone, only the One. And do not say, “You must accept my view,” for this is their [the majority’s] right, not yours.

– Pirke Avos, 4:7-8

 

Sensitivity… Even When the Going Gets Tough

Vayigash (Genesis 44:18-47:27) – by Shoshanna Dresner, aish.com

Yosef had been sold by his brothers as a slave, imprisoned in Egypt, and then in an unexpected turn of events promoted to one of the highest positions in the land. In an astonishing story so clearly led by Divine providence Yosef’s brothers also found themselves in Egypt, in a search for grain during a difficult famine.

Not realizing that the Governor in Egypt that they had been dealing with all along during their stay was their long-lost brother, it was finally time for Yosef to reveal his identity to them.

Overcome with emotion, it would have been easy for Yosef to simply announce who he was in front of everyone present. However, even in the heat of the moment he was sensitive to his brothers’ feelings and asked the Egyptians to leave the room so that his brothers wouldn’t be shamed about their sin of selling him in front of anyone else.

An incredible example of self-control and sensitivity.

When people are emotionally excited, whether the situation is a happy one, or G-d forbid a challenge, it is very easy to be so absorbed in what is happening that the feelings of others are forgotten.

A true master of the art of kindness will not forget.

Such a person will have trained him or herself to be so acutely aware of the feelings of those around them, to the extent that even when the situation is challenging, or there is no time to think, their reaction is still of utmost sensitivity.

The Bigger Brisket

Moishe and Miriam were sitting down to eat at the dinner table. Miriam commented, “You know, Moishe, when we were first married, you took the small piece of brisket and gave me the larger. Now you take the large one and leave me the smaller. You don’t love me anymore?”

“Nonsense, honey,” replied Moishe, “you just cook better now.”

A Healthy Breakfast

Moshe was taking to his psychiatrist. “I had a weird dream recently,” he says. “I saw my mother but then I noticed she had your face. I found this so worrying that I immediately awoke and couldn’t get back to sleep. I just stayed there thinking about it until 7am. I got up, made myself a slice of toast and some coffee and came straight here. Can you please help me explain the meaning of my dream?”

The psychiatrist kept silent for some time, then said, “One slice of toast and coffee? Do you call that a breakfast?”

For information or to join Sisterhood, call the NHBZ office at 314-991-2100, ext. 3, or email: sisterhood@nhbz.org