The Sisterhood Scoop – July 18th, 2020

Volume 3 Number 21 – July 11th, 2020 – 19 Tamuz 5780

 

 

Join Sisterhood Book Club and come read with us!

The next Book Club meeting will be on Zoom on Monday August 24, 7:15-8:45PM, and the book selection is: The Lost Girls of Paris, by Pam Jenoff. Set in Manhattan, New York, in 1946, Grace Healey passed through Grand Central Terminal on her way to work and found an abandoned suitcase beneath a bench.

Inside she discovered twelve photographs of different women. A remarkable story of friendship and courage centered around three women and a ring of female secret agents during World War II.

For more information call Terri Schnitzer 

This Week’s Quote

One cannot and must not try to erase the past merely because it does not fit the present.” – Golda Meir

 

ANNOUNCING A NEW SISTERHOOD CLASS

REBBITZEN CHANI SPEAKS ON: What on Earth Does G-d Want from Me?Learning how to respond to a crisis from great Jewish women of our time.

Wednesday, July 22

7:00 PM

OPEN TO EVERYONE

Zoom link: https://zoom.us/j/295822730

Parshah Masay: ‘PerfectTravels’

adapted from Rabbi Shraga Simmons (www.aish.com)

Parshat Masay enumerates the 42 different locations at which the Jewish people encamped during their 40 years in the desert. The travel route was determined by G-d’s Cloud of Glory which accompanied them: When the Cloud rose, the Jews traveled, and when the Cloud settled, they encamped. The people never knew how long each encampment would be; they stayed in some places for many years, and others for as briefly as 12 hours. G-d issued no advance itinerary.

Based on these encampments, the Talmud derives many laws of Shabbat observance. One such law is the prohibition of dismantling a structure, in order to build a new one in its place. This is derived from the fact that the Jews would dismantle and reassemble their camp every time they traveled.

But, the commentators ask, why does the Shabbat law only pertain to rebuilding in the same location? During the Jewish travels, the dismantling was in order to rebuild in the next encampment – a different place!

To appreciate the answer, let’s imagine a baby on a train ride, travelling in his mother’s arms. From the child’s perspective, he has never moved. He’s always exactly where he should be, in his mother’s arms.

So too, since the Jews in the desert started and stopped according to G-d’s plan, they were always exactly where they should be. The geography might have changed, but ultimately their position was the same.

The lesson for us today? Our stations in life are only temporary. Our direction is constantly changing, taking us to new unknowns. Sometimes we may wish to be back in our old comfort zone. But in truth, the place where G-d directs us … is the perfect place to be

For information or to join Sisterhood, call the NHBZ office at 314-991-2100, ext. 3, or email: sisterhood@nhbz.org